Lullabot

Lullabot's 7th Annual DrupalCon Party

Lullabot's annual party has become a DrupalCon tradition – fun friendly people hanging out and having a good time. If you're new to DrupalCon, it's a great place to meet people. If you're an old-timer like most of us, it's a great place to see old friends and make new ones.

Lullabot Named Top Development And Design Agency

Clutch is a research firm that analyzes and reviews software and professional services agencies, covering more than 500 companies in over 50 different markets. Like a Consumer Reports for the agency sector, they do independent research. They publish their results at Clutch.co. Recently, they reviewed Lullabot, interviewing our clients; they created a profile of Lullabot with the results. Lullabot received top marks across the board.

In January, Clutch published a press release listing Lullabot first overall on its international list of web development agencies. We've always been very proud of our work, but it's really amazing to be recognized like this by an independent research firm. In March, Clutch sent out another press release that lists Lullabot as top in Boston-area web design and development agencies. We'll take it!

Clutch also provides matrix-based research results comparing agencies based on focus and ability to deliver. Lullabot floats to the top of both the Top Web Development Companies and the Top Web Design & Development Firms in Boston showing high-focus and the most proven ability to deliver of any agency in the listings.

Since 2006, we've built an incredible team at Lullabot and I'd like to thank all of our employees for their contributions. We've also partnered with scores of magnificant clients over the years. We'd like to thank them all for their trust and collaboration. Of course, Clutch's listings are dynamic and ongoing. We can't sit back and expect to remain in the top position. We will continue to strive to be the best agency we can be, providing superlative results for our clients while continuing to provide a rewarding work environment for our talented team of expert developers, designers, and strategists.

Noz Urbina Explains Adaptive Content

In this episode, Jeff Eaton talks to Content Strategist Noz Urbina about Adaptive Content and the changing face of customer engagement. What does "omni-channel" mean? Is it more than a buzzword? What steps can organizations take to prepare for it? Spoiler Alert: It all relies on well-modeled content… Along the way, they discuss the storied history of structured content, the challenge of effective content personalization, and the existential horror of old-school WYSIWYG editors.

Beyond Decoupling: The Inherent Virtues of an API

Fellow Lullabot Andrew Berry has written an article on why to decouple. If you do go this route, it’s because you’ve thought a lot about how to separate concerns. Content consumers are separated from content producers. Front-end developers are freed from the dictates of a back-end CMS. This article isn't about the separation of concerns, but rather what lies at the middle of all of these concerns— your HTTP API.

Distributed Design

Design work is a lot of show-and-tell. It can be challenging to effectively communicate and collaborate on a distributed team. Join hostess Amber Matz, Lullabot Creative Director Jared Ponchot, Lullabot UX Designer Jen Witkowski, and Justin Harrell, Interactive Designer for Drupalize.Me, as they talk about the unique challenges, processes, and tools they use as part of a distributed team.

Importing huge databases faster

Over the past few months I have been banging my head against a problem at MSNBC: importing the site's extremely large database to my local environment took more than two hours. With a fast internet connection, the database could be downloaded in a matter of minutes, but importing it for testing still took far too long. Ugh!

In this article I'll walk through the troubleshooting process I used to improve things, and the approaches I tried — eventually optimizing the several-hour import to a mere 10-15 minutes.

The Peer Review How-To Guide

When we started with the MSNBC project, my colleague, Jerad Bitner, established a process that each ticket would be implemented in a Git branch and a pull request would then be created for someone on the team to review. I had done a bit of peer reviewing in the past, but this experience was totally different.

Mental Health and Open Source

This week we have a special episode to talk about mental health. This is a hard topic for many people to speak about publicly, so we're lucky to have Addison Berry joined by Mike Bell, Greg Dunlap, and Blake Hall to dive into this subject. Mike recently gave a presentation on this topic at Drupalcamp London. The four of us discuss some of the pressures we feel, ways we try to handle them, ideas for how the community can support help support all of us in good mental health, and some resources to check out.

Choosing the Right JavaScript Framework for the Job

If you’ve been following web development over the past few years, you will no doubt have noticed that JavaScript frameworks are an increasingly popular way to build web applications. Although there are many frameworks out there, four of them stand out: Backbone, AngularJS, Ember and React.

Getting Together When You Work Apart

This is the final article in my series on being a new Lullabot, where I focus on what it’s like when we get together in person. Catch up with Part 1 and Part 2 to learn more about what it’s like working apart.

Drupalize.Me 2015 Spring Update

The Drupalize.Me team typically gets together each quarter to go over how we did with our goals and to plan out what we want to accomplish and prioritize in the upcoming quarter. These goals range from site upgrades to our next content sprints. A few weeks ago we all flew into Atlanta and did just that. We feel it is important to communicate to our members and the Drupal community at-large, what we've been doing in the world of Drupal training and what our plans are for the near future. What better way to do this than our own podcast.

Form API #states

Drupal's Form API helps developers build complex, extendable user input forms with minimal code. One of its most powerful features, though, isn't very well known: the #states system. Form API #states allow us to create form elements that change state (show, hide, enable, disable, etc.) depending on certain conditions—for example, disabling one field based on the contents of another. For most common Form UI tasks, the #states system eliminates the need to write custom JavaScript. It eliminates inconsistencies by translating simple form element properties into standardized JavaScript code.

DrupalCon 2015: Lullabot Sessions

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This year we have a variety of presentations for you at DrupalCon LA. These all come out of the hard work we're doing all year round on projects such as Tesla, Syfy, SNL, NBC, Bravo (to name a few), and also within the Drupal community.

Robert Douglass and Thomas Bonte: Open Source Bach

This special bonus episode of Hacking Culture coincides with the release of the Open Well-Tempered Clavier, a Kickstarter-funded project to produce a public domain recording and digital score of Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier, plus a braille edition for blind musicians.

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