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Stay (Mission) Focused: A Simple Tool to Help You Save Time and Speed Up Your Organization

NTEN -

Jesse Flores Founder Startup Lansing Here's a simple and elegant way to cut out the cut-and-paste parts of your work life.

Most of us are both time- and budget-strapped. We want to stay focused on our mission, but, try as we may, it seems there is always more to do than there is time to do it. Yet, the people we serve and the funders who underwrite our efforts expect us to produce results. So, what's a time- and cash-strapped nonprofit to do? Here’s an answer: Automate time-consuming, but necessary processes using modern technology.

Hotter than your morning coffee: Google Drive for Work

Google Enterprise Blog -

Posted by Scott Johnston, Director of Product Management, Google Drive

People want tools that are both powerful and easy to use. For employees, that means they should be able to access their work wherever they are, on their favorite device or share their work securely with their colleagues, even if they’re in different offices, cities or countries. For IT managers, that means never worrying about storage quotas again, or being able to track access and sharing across users and files. We realize how important this is, so earlier this summer we introduced Google Drive for Work, a package that wraps all of this together for just $10 per user per month. Here’s a look at what’s been brewing with Drive for Work over the past two months.

Helping employees collaborate on the go

Before we introduced Drive for Work, businesses like retailer Chico’s and aerospace and defense company Rockwell Collins were using Drive to increase collaboration across distributed teams. Travis Perkins relies on Google Drive to store and share more than 1.3 million documents across thousands of physical locations, to help reduce employee travel and save time. OVS uses Google Drive to streamline its supply chain by sharing and syncing their files across desktops, tablets and smartphones so people have the information they need, no matter where they are or what device they’re using.

Today more than 1,800 businesses sign up for Drive for Work each week. Customers like WeddingWire are taking advantage of the full capabilities of Drive for Work to help provide their employees with the collaboration and file sharing tools they need on any device, whether they’re in the office or on the road.

Extending the Drive ecosystem

Drive for Work includes everything you need to keep all your work safe, easy to share and available anywhere. A growing number of partners are building tools on top of the Drive platform to meet the particular needs of our customers. In addition to the new Audit view built into the admin console, Drive for Work also includes an Audit API that partners have used to build advanced insight and security extensions like Data Loss Prevention (DLP). Other partners have built tools to help move business content into Drive from any location, including old file servers, local hard drives or other cloud storage products.

Keeping your work safe and available

To help keep your work safe, all files uploaded to Google Drive will be encrypted, not only from your device to Google and in transit between Google data centers, but also at rest on Google servers. Our reliability engineers monitor Google’s systems 24x7 in order to quickly identify and address any issues that might arise. Last year, Google Drive achieved 99.985% availability, which averages to less than 90 minutes of disruption per year (our SLA guarantees 99.9%). If there’s ever an issue, you can read up-to-date status information on the Status Dashboard, and if you ever need to speak to someone, help is just a call away in over a dozen languages across 50 countries.

If you’d like to join the more than 190 million people actively using Drive, you can learn more about Drive for Work online or contact us for more information. If you’re already a Google Apps customer, you can upgrade with just a couple of clicks in the Admin console.

Collaborating should be easy. Let technology do the hard work and help you get back to what’s most important — your business.

Hotter than your morning coffee: Google Drive for Work

Google Enterprise Blog -

Posted by Scott Johnston, Director of Product Management, Google Drive

People want tools that are both powerful and easy to use. For employees, that means they should be able to access their work wherever they are, on their favorite device or share their work securely with their colleagues, even if they’re in different offices, cities or countries. For IT managers, that means never worrying about storage quotas again, or being able to track access and sharing across users and files. We realize how important this is, so earlier this summer we introduced Google Drive for Work, a package that wraps all of this together for just $10 per user per month. Here’s a look at what’s been brewing with Drive for Work over the past two months.

Helping employees collaborate on the go

Before we introduced Drive for Work, businesses like retailer Chico’s and aerospace and defense company Rockwell Collins were using Drive to increase collaboration across distributed teams. Travis Perkins relies on Google Drive to store and share more than 1.3 million documents across thousands of physical locations, to help reduce employee travel and save time. OVS uses Google Drive to streamline its supply chain by sharing and syncing their files across desktops, tablets and smartphones so people have the information they need, no matter where they are or what device they’re using.

Today more than 1,800 businesses sign up for Drive for Work each week. Customers like WeddingWire are taking advantage of the full capabilities of Drive for Work to help provide their employees with the collaboration and file sharing tools they need on any device, whether they’re in the office or on the road.

Extending the Drive ecosystem

Drive for Work includes everything you need to keep all your work safe, easy to share and available anywhere. A growing number of partners are building tools on top of the Drive platform to meet the particular needs of our customers. In addition to the new Audit view built into the admin console, Drive for Work also includes an Audit API that partners have used to build advanced insight and security extensions like Data Loss Prevention (DLP). Other partners have built tools to help move business content into Drive from any location, including old file servers, local hard drives or other cloud storage products.

Keeping your work safe and available

To help keep your work safe, all files uploaded to Google Drive will be encrypted, not only from your device to Google and in transit between Google data centers, but also at rest on Google servers. Our reliability engineers monitor Google’s systems 24x7 in order to quickly identify and address any issues that might arise. Last year, Google Drive achieved 99.985% availability, which averages to less than 90 minutes of disruption per year (our SLA guarantees 99.9%). If there’s ever an issue, you can read up-to-date status information on the Status Dashboard, and if you ever need to speak to someone, help is just a call away in over a dozen languages across 50 countries.

If you’d like to join the more than 190 million people actively using Drive, you can learn more about Drive for Work online or contact us for more information. If you’re already a Google Apps customer, you can upgrade with just a couple of clicks in the Admin console.

Collaborating should be easy. Let technology do the hard work and help you get back to what’s most important — your business.

Get Pantheon Blog: Headless Drupal Demo - Working Code and Call to Action

Planet Drupal -

We had a pretty good turnout here at Pantheon HQ for a Headless Drupal themed SF Drupal User’s Group:

Good crowd at SFDUG for #headlessDrupal pic.twitter.com/55miCJdzSl

— Josh Koenig (@outlandishjosh) August 19, 2014

The excitement is clear. So what's next?

Put Your Code Where Your Mouth Is

In any place where there's much excitement, there also tends to be a lot of discussion about what could or should be done. My suggestion is that we focus on creating real-world implementations with various JS frameworks and other API consuming clients.

To that end, I'm putting my code where my mouth is. Here's a working demo site:

I've placed the rough demo code online at GitHub, so you can set up your own. Feel free to experiment with different implementations, or help out with the listed TODOs. Pull requests are welcome!

Next Steps

My ultimate vision is that we have a commonly accepted goal for demonstration implementations, and we find people who want to work on them for a number of popular JS MVC frameworks. It would also be interesting to have people do straight API implementations in raw Python or Ruby, or even just using Curl.

The end result would be something similar to TodoMVC, which helps people evaluate and embrace different JS frameworks. Having a repository of implementations would definitely speed up the process of attracting front-end developers to think about Drupal as a back-end for future projects.

At the same time, by focusing on practical/working implementations, we can much more effectively provide input and guidance to the continued core (and contrib) development. There's no need for Drupal engineers to build Headless in a vacuum.

Stay tuned for more updates as we see the outcomes of the community response. Based on what I've seen online and at the SF DUG meetup, I think some really exciting energy will come out of this.

Blog Categories: Engineering

Macmillan: We did not hijack #icebucketchallenge

AFP Blog -

Macmillan: We did not hijack #icebucketchallenge: Macmillan has hit back against accusations on social media that it has hijacked #icebucketchallenge, saying the craze has been raising money for cancer charities in New Zealand since July.

The challenge has peaked in publicity in the last week as celebrities in the US continue to nominate each other, while showing off their famous friends, to pour iced water over themselves and donate money to American charity ALS Association.

Chromebooks give back time to Chapters Health System’s patients and caregivers

Google Enterprise Blog -

Posted by Chris Williams, Director of IT and Support Services, Chapters Health System

Editor's note: Today’s guest blogger is Chris Williams, Director of IT and Support Services for Chapters Health System, which provides post-acute, palliative, and hospice care to patients in west-central Florida. See what other organizations that have gone Google have to say.

At Chapters Health System, the role of IT is to provide software, connectivity and hardware to caregivers so they can spend less time wrestling with technology, and more time caring for patients. Our goal is to make the IT portion transparent to providing superior patient care. Most of our nurses and caregivers are mobile – they visit patients in hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living facilities or in their homes.

To best support them, we virtualized our clinical and business software applications, and provide access to them via Citrix XenApp via Receiver. We also make sure our caregivers can stay connected through a Verizon 4G Mifi device. As for hardware, caregivers were using Windows notebooks but boot-up delays, long setup times for new machines, and the bulkiness of the devices were slowing down and frustrating our caregivers. In addition, the devices were hard to manage by the IT support staff.

To find a solution, we took a democratic approach and asked caregivers to evaluate four devices: the HP Chromebook 14 for Business, Apple iPad, a Windows thin client, and a traditional Windows notebook. Caregivers rated the HP Chromebook 14 higher than any other device in all areas, including form factor, battery life, ease of use, speed and performance of virtualized applications like Microsoft Outlook and clinical applications, as well as web applications. Ninety-two out of 139 caregivers who participated in our study voted the Chromebook as their favorite device for work.
Luckily for us in IT, Chromebooks for Business are also the easiest devices to deploy and manage, freeing up our own time for other projects. The biggest change we’ve heard about so far is improved speed. With a traditional Windows notebook, caregivers faced three to four minute boot times, plus multiple logins to Windows, their VPN, and then finally Citrix and the applications. With Chromebooks, boot time shrank dramatically and Chromebooks start up right at the Citrix login screen, so caregivers can access clinical data right away.

Speed benefits extend to setup time as well. Some of our supplemental and weekend caregivers borrow from a pool of shared devices, and it took 40 minutes to set up each Windows notebook. With Chromebooks for Business, we can hop into the management console and set up a new Chromebook in under five minutes. Even better, we use the management console to configure access for users so that if they need to borrow a machine we don’t have to get involved at all—they just pick up a Chromebook and log in. Since each caregiver can get his or her specific user experience on any Chromebook, it's easy for the devices to be shared.

For additional security and simplicity, we use Chromebook for Business’s Kiosk mode to offer one single application, the Citrix login screen, but we’ll be extending it other web applications soon. We also use the management console to mandate the proxy server for Internet access—a feature that’s built-in to each Chromebook for Business.

Chromebooks are giving back precious time to caregivers and their patients. In fact, we’re looking at purchasing many more Chromebooks in the near future so we can extend the benefits to even more Chapters Health employees.

Chromebooks give back time to Chapters Health System’s patients and caregivers

Google Enterprise Blog -

Posted by Chris Williams, Director of IT and Support Services, Chapters Health System

Editor's note: Today’s guest blogger is Chris Williams, Director of IT and Support Services for Chapters Health System, which provides post-acute, palliative, and hospice care to patients in west-central Florida. See what other organizations that have gone Google have to say.

At Chapters Health System, the role of IT is to provide software, connectivity and hardware to caregivers so they can spend less time wrestling with technology, and more time caring for patients. Our goal is to make the IT portion transparent to providing superior patient care. Most of our nurses and caregivers are mobile – they visit patients in hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living facilities or in their homes.

To best support them, we virtualized our clinical and business software applications, and provide access to them via Citrix XenApp via Receiver. We also make sure our caregivers can stay connected through a Verizon 4G Mifi device. As for hardware, caregivers were using Windows notebooks but boot-up delays, long setup times for new machines, and the bulkiness of the devices were slowing down and frustrating our caregivers. In addition, the devices were hard to manage by the IT support staff.

To find a solution, we took a democratic approach and asked caregivers to evaluate four devices: the HP Chromebook 14 for Business, Apple iPad, a Windows thin client, and a traditional Windows notebook. Caregivers rated the HP Chromebook 14 higher than any other device in all areas, including form factor, battery life, ease of use, speed and performance of virtualized applications like Microsoft Outlook and clinical applications, as well as web applications. Ninety-two out of 139 caregivers who participated in our study voted the Chromebook as their favorite device for work.
Luckily for us in IT, Chromebooks for Business are also the easiest devices to deploy and manage, freeing up our own time for other projects. The biggest change we’ve heard about so far is improved speed. With a traditional Windows notebook, caregivers faced three to four minute boot times, plus multiple logins to Windows, their VPN, and then finally Citrix and the applications. With Chromebooks, boot time shrank dramatically and Chromebooks start up right at the Citrix login screen, so caregivers can access clinical data right away.

Speed benefits extend to setup time as well. Some of our supplemental and weekend caregivers borrow from a pool of shared devices, and it took 40 minutes to set up each Windows notebook. With Chromebooks for Business, we can hop into the management console and set up a new Chromebook in under five minutes. Even better, we use the management console to configure access for users so that if they need to borrow a machine we don’t have to get involved at all—they just pick up a Chromebook and log in. Since each caregiver can get his or her specific user experience on any Chromebook, it's easy for the devices to be shared.

For additional security and simplicity, we use Chromebook for Business’s Kiosk mode to offer one single application, the Citrix login screen, but we’ll be extending it other web applications soon. We also use the management console to mandate the proxy server for Internet access—a feature that’s built-in to each Chromebook for Business.

Chromebooks are giving back precious time to caregivers and their patients. In fact, we’re looking at purchasing many more Chromebooks in the near future so we can extend the benefits to even more Chapters Health employees.

Why Your Nonprofit Should Invest in Video As Part Its Communications Strategy

Beth's Blog -

Photo Credit: Tristan Hanson

Why Your Nonprofit Should Invest in Video As Part Its Communications Strategy – Guest Post by Michael Hoffman, CEO of See3

It’s obvious to anyone who spends time online that video is taking over the internet. It is the dominant form of content we all engage with – on our desktops, our tablets and now our phones. And when video is paired with a continuous strategy and clear metrics for success, there is overwhelming evidence showing that it is a crucial, important investment for nonprofits.

And so it continues to surprise me that nonprofits invest far too little in video content, as if they are somehow exempt from this general trend.

In the Into Focus report, See3, YouTube and Edelman surveyed nonprofit staff and found that the clear majority recognizes the power of video. In fact,

  • 80% of respondents said video is important to their organization today,
  • 91% believe video will become more important in the next 3 years, and
  • 92% value the investment they have made in video.

So, you would think that budgets would be going up accordingly. Not so.

Fully two-thirds of respondents reported that their budgets for video would be flat or decline!

Finding the ROI

One reason for the disconnect between stated belief in video and video budgets has been the lack of hard data about the return on investment (ROI). Video is cool, but it is also expensive (in time and money). It’s no surprise that a tactic with a cost is high and unclear ROI gets minimal resources.

But we have reached an inflection point. There is enough data today to warrant a major investment in video.

Not A Video but a Video Strategy

From my conversations with organizational leaders, I have found that there is too much focus on one video, rather than a video strategy. If you spend a lot of time and money on one video, and that video has poor results, it is no wonder that you hesitate to do more.

When we say video works, we don’t mean every video works, any more than we mean every email works or every direct mail piece works. To know that your email works you have to be sending email regularly – and developing clear metrics for what success looks like. The same is true with video. To see the impact of video, you have to be using it as an ongoing means of communications, not a one-off project that carries all your hopes and dreams.

An ongoing investment in video starts with strategy. When we create video strategy we answer the questions like what has worked for you, what assets and resources do you have, and what stories are there to tell.

With the big picture in mind, lets look at the recent evidence for a video investment.

Video Stats: How Video Impacts Constituent Behavior

You can see how much video dominates YouTube, Facebook and Twitter. But the evidence that people are watching wasn’t enough to convince most organizational leaders to make significant investments. Now we have evidence that gets directly to the level of user behavior.

These stats were culled from many different reports, most meant for corporate marketers. You can use these stats with your leadership to secure some video resources.

  • When the word video is used in an email subject line, open rates double. (Experian Digital Marketing Report)
  • Click-through rates increase 2-3 times when a video is included in an email. (Digital Sherpa)
  • Companies using video require 37% fewer site visits before a person responds to a call to action. (Aberdeen Group and Brightcove)
  • People who watch video are 85% more likely to make a purchase than those who don’t. (Kiosked and Brightcove)
  • If you ever hope to reach a younger audience, you need to be using video. According to a 2013 ComScore study, 83% of 12-17 year olds and 91% of 18-24 year olds are watching online video on a regular basis.

Large companies like Zappos and Cars.com have impressive case studies showing how video has helped them reach their goals. While nonprofit video case studies are harder to come by, the overwhelming direction of the evidence is that video works.

There aren’t excuses any more. Our nonprofit organizations may not be equipped with the talent or the mindset to use more video, but we have to change. We have to adapt and jump in, or the most valuable currency of all — attention — will be in short supply for the important work we do.

Michael Hoffman is the CEO of See3 Communications and an authority on developing video strategy for social good.

 

 

 

Ice-Bucket Torrent Reaches $8.6-Million in a Day and Douses Ex-President – Philanthropy Today - Blogs - The Chronicle of Philanthropy

AFP Blog -

Ice-Bucket Torrent Reaches $8.6-Million in a Day and Douses Ex-President – Philanthropy Today - Blogs - The Chronicle of Philanthropy: Ice-Bucket Torrent Reaches $8.6-Million in a Day and Douses Ex-President

The flood of “ice-bucket challenge” donations to fight Lou Gehrig’s disease reached a new crest Wednesday as the ALS Association reported taking in $8.6-million over a 24-hour period, Time writes.

How to Create an Ice Bucket-type Challenge for Your Nonprofit: A Formula for Success - Clairification

AFP Blog -

How to Create an Ice Bucket-type Challenge for Your Nonprofit: A Formula for Success - Clairification: re you wringing your hands because your boss or board wants you to come up with a viral social campaign to rival the “Ice Bucket Challenge?” Oy!

I was first introduced to this phenomenon one evening as I was watching the Jimmy Fallon show on t.v. Jimmy, some of his crew and his band all dumped buckets of ice water on their heads; then challenged the New York Jets to do so as well (Jimmy had been challenged by Justin Timberlake). I had no idea why they were doing it or what the “Ice Bucket Challenge” was about.

Midwestern Mac, LLC: Solr for Drupal Developers, Part 2: Solr and Drupal, A History

Planet Drupal -

Drupal has included basic site search functionality since its first public release. Search administration was added in Drupal 2.0.0 in 2001, and search quality, relevance, and customization was improved dramatically throughout the Drupal 4.x series, especially in Drupal 4.7.0. Drupal's built-in search provides decent database-backed search, but offers a minimal set of features, and slows down dramatically as the size of a Drupal site grows beyond thousands of nodes.

In the mid-2000s, when most custom search solutions were relatively niche products, and the Google Search Appliance dominated the field of large-scale custom search, Yonik Seeley started working on Solr for CNet Networks. Solr was designed to work with Lucene, and offered fast indexing, extremely fast search, and as time went on, other helpful features like distributed search and geospatial search. Once the project was open-sourced and released under the Apache Software Foundation's umbrella in 2006, the search engine became one of the most popular engines for customized and more performant site search.

As an aside, I am writing this series of blog posts from the perspective of a Drupal developer who has worked with large-scale, highly customized Solr search for Mercy (example), and with a variety of small-to-medium sites who are using Hosted Apache Solr, a service I've been running as part of Midwestern Mac since early 2011.

Timeline of Apache Solr and Drupal Solr Integration

If you can't view the timeline, please click through and read this article on Midwestern Mac's website directly.

A brief history of Apache Solr Search and Search API Solr

Only two years after Apache Solr was released, the first module that integrated Solr with Drupal, Apache Solr Search, was created. Originally, the module was written for Drupal 5.x, but it has been actively maintained for many years and was ported to Drupal 6 and 7, with some relatively major rewrites and modifications to keep the module up to date, easy to use, and integrated with all of Apache Solr's new features over time. As Solr gained popularity, many Drupal sites started switching from using core search or the Views module to using Apache Solr.

erdfisch: New module: Image widget default image

Planet Drupal -

As part of a client project we recently had the requirement of displaying an image field's default image in the node add form, before the user had uploaded a picture. This seemed simple enough to implement but thinking about it I realized this was quite a generic feature request and that such a module might prove useful for others. Rather by accident I even noticed that Drupal.org itself employs the same feature on user profile pages.

Thus, I hereby present the Image widget default image module, which does just that: If you have provided a default image for an image field and the user has not yet uploaded an image for that field, it displays that default image as a preview. Not many bells or whistle, but it works. (I can claim that, because it comes with tests. ) If it does not work for you or if you have any questions please leave a comment or open an issue on Drupal.org.

Weitere Bilder: 

Code Karate: Multiple Views Part 2

Planet Drupal -

Episode Number: 163

In part 2 of the multiple views series you will learn how to add the jQuery needed to switch between multiple classes. By having the ability to use multiple classes, we will (in part 3) be able to use CSS to change the look and feel of the same view.

Here is the jQuery code used to switch between grid and list view:

Tags: DrupalViewsDrupal 7Theme DevelopmentDrupal PlanetJavascriptJQuery

DrupalCon Amsterdam: Training spotlight: Professional Agile Project Management For Drupal Projects

Planet Drupal -

Over 30 people attended this wildly successful training at DrupalCon Austin. Now is your chance to attend this training at DrupalCon Amsterdam!

In this course, we cut past the evangelism that exists around Agile, and instead focus on real-world practical training that you can put into action.

The course is delivered using the Agile Scrum techniques it teaches. At the start, delegates see the backlog of requirements that the product owner (a trainer) has developed for the course, and the prioritization of those requirements. The course then progresses in one-hour periods of work called sprints, working through training modules from the top of the backlog.

Part way through the morning, delegates are ready to take over as the product owners. They will take responsibility for specifying the requirements for the course, based on the needs and interests of the delegates in the room, re-prioritise them, and even add completely new requirements. Our trainers will respond to these changes by creating new training modules on the fly based on real project experience, to provide the highest possible value to the delegates.

Through this approach we demonstrate and explain the processes of Agile many times, and we also demonstrate their value, and delegates leave with a real insight into how they could apply agile, and handle some of the challenges they may have faced.

The trainers are highly experienced Agile coaches, who mentor teams at Wunderkraut (known as WunderRoot in the UK), as well as consulting with large clients about ensuring successful delivery of their projects.

Meet the Trainers from Wunderkraut

Steve Parks (steveparks), UK Managing Director
Vesa Palmu (wesku), CEO
Roel De Meester (demeester_roel), CTO Benelux
Florian Huber (fuber), Project Manager, Scrum Master

Attend this Drupal Training

This training will be held on Monday, 29 September from 09:00-17:00 at the Amsterdam RAI during DrupalCon Amsterdam. The cost of attending this training is €400 and includes training materials, meals and coffee breaks. A DrupalCon ticket is not required to register to attend this event.

Our training courses are designed to be small enough to provide attendees plenty of one-on-one time with the instructor, but large enough that they are a good use of the instructor's time. Each training course must meet its minimum sign-up number by 5 September in order for the course to take place. You can help to ensure your training course takes place by registering before this date and asking friends and colleagues to attend.

Register today

Four Kitchens: DrupalCamp Twin Cities: Frontend Wrap-up

Planet Drupal -

This year’s Twin Cities DrupalCamp had no shortage of new faces, quality sessions, trainings, and after parties. Most of my time was spent in frontend sessions and talking with folks. Being that I live in Minneapolis, this camp is especially rewarding from a hometown Drupal represent kind of perspective. Below are some of my favorite sessions and camp highlights.

Community Drupal

Raiders of the Lost Archives, or How I Made Volunteer Data Entry Fun

NTEN -

Lillian Karabaic Zine Librarian Independent Publishing Resource Center Is it possible to create an app that gets volunteers traveling across the country to enter data for a nonprofit?

The Independent Publishing Resource Center (IPRC) supports Portland’s arts and writing community and curates North America’s largest zine library, a circulating archive of self-published and otherwise underground and rare publications. Our collection is well-known, diverse, and spans seven decades and over 60 languages.

As glorious as the zine library is, we have developed an enviable problem of scale.

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